Image Cytometry
Collapse CYTO 2013: Introduction to Image-Based Cytometry
Modern optical microscopy techniques have enabled the acquisition of quantitative information from cells with unprecedented accuracy and specificity. This technology is poised to continue making a significant impact in health related sciences by facilitating diagnosis as well as enabling important discoveries related to cellular mechanisms. The purpose of this short course is to enable scientists and technical practitioners to utilize the most commonly available optical imaging hardware and software tools to quantitatively describe and analyze cellular processes. It aims to provide the necessary background as well as to introduce the terminology, concepts, and methodological approaches employed in modern image cytometry and high-content screening. The course will expand and strengthen the participants' knowledge and understanding of modern digital high-content microscopy techniques. It will provide participants with the required tools for quantitative interpretation of image-based experiments.

The course is intended for researchers and students who have previous experience with other optical methods such as flow cytometry or basic optical microscopy.

All CYTO U courses qualify for ICCE continuing education credit. If you would like to see a list of topics included in this recording, please click on the "Topics" tab.

Formats Available: Streaming
Original Seminar Date: May 18, 2013
On-Demand Release Date: Available Now

Approved Credit:
  • ISAC: 3.00 hours ICCE
  • ASCP: 3.00 hours CMLE

  • Topics & Pricing InformationTopics & Pricing Information CYTO 2013: Introduction to Image-Based Cytometry
    Collapse The Essentials of Optics and Fluorescence Microscopy for Cell Biology Applications (2013 Advanced Data Analysis PreCongress Course)
    Modern optical microscopy techniques have enabled the acquisition of quantitative information from cells with unprecedented accuracy and specificity. This technology is poised to continue making a significant impact in health related sciences by facilitating diagnosis as well as enabling important discoveries related to cellular mechanisms. The purpose of this short course is to enable scientists and technical practitioners to utilize the most commonly available optical imaging hardware and software tools to quantitatively describe and analyze cellular processes. It aims to provide the necessary background as well as to introduce the terminology, concepts, and methodological approaches employed in modern image cytometry and high-content screening. The course will expand and strengthen the participants' knowledge and understanding of modern digital high-content microscopy techniques. It will provide participants with the required tools for quantitative interpretation of image-based experiments.

    The course is intended for researchers and students who have previous experience with other optical methods such as flow cytometry or basic optical microscopy.

    Topics covered in this session include:

    • Image formation (diffraction, magnification, etc.)
    • Fluorescence (staining,photodamage, etc.)
    • 3D and live cell imaging

    All CYTO U courses qualify for ICCE continuing education credit.
    Formats Available: Streaming
    Original Seminar Date: May 18, 2013
    On-Demand Release Date: Available Now

    Approved Credit:
  • ISAC: 1 hour ICCE
  • ASCP: 1 hour CMLE

  • Topics & Pricing InformationTopics & Pricing Information The Essentials of Optics and Fluorescence Microscopy for Cell Biology Applications (2013 Advanced Data Analysis PreCongress Course)
    Collapse Digital Imaging Systems from Photons to Images (2013 Introduction to Image-Based Cytometry PreCongress Course)
    Modern optical microscopy techniques have enabled the acquisition of quantitative information from cells with unprecedented accuracy and specificity. This technology is poised to continue making a significant impact in health related sciences by facilitating diagnosis as well as enabling important discoveries related to cellular mechanisms. The purpose of this short course is to enable scientists and technical practitioners to utilize the most commonly available optical imaging hardware and software tools to quantitatively describe and analyze cellular processes. It aims to provide the necessary background as well as to introduce the terminology, concepts, and methodological approaches employed in modern image cytometry and high-content screening. The course will expand and strengthen the participants' knowledge and understanding of modern digital high-content microscopy techniques. It will provide participants with the required tools for quantitative interpretation of image-based experiments.

    The course is intended for researchers and students who have previous experience with other optical methods such as flow cytometry or basic optical microscopy.

    • Photon detection
    • Detectors
    • Noise
    • Digital resolution
    • Calibration
    All CYTO U courses qualify for ICCE continuing education credit.
    Formats Available: Streaming
    Original Seminar Date: May 18, 2013
    On-Demand Release Date: Available Now

    Approved Credit:
  • ISAC: 1 hour ICCE
  • ASCP: 1 hour CMLE

  • Topics & Pricing InformationTopics & Pricing Information Digital Imaging Systems from Photons to Images (2013 Introduction to Image-Based Cytometry PreCongress Course)
    Collapse Introduction to Image Processing and Analysis for Cytometry (2013 Introduction to Image-Based Cytometry PreCongress Course)
    Modern optical microscopy techniques have enabled the acquisition of quantitative information from cells with unprecedented accuracy and specificity. This technology is poised to continue making a significant impact in health related sciences by facilitating diagnosis as well as enabling important discoveries related to cellular mechanisms. The purpose of this short course is to enable scientists and technical practitioners to utilize the most commonly available optical imaging hardware and software tools to quantitatively describe and analyze cellular processes. It aims to provide the necessary background as well as to introduce the terminology, concepts, and methodological approaches employed in modern image cytometry and high-content screening. The course will expand and strengthen the participants' knowledge and understanding of modern digital high-content microscopy techniques. It will provide participants with the required tools for quantitative interpretation of image-based experiments.The course is intended for researchers and students who have previous experience with other optical methods such as flow cytometry or basic optical microscopy.

    Topics covered in this session include:
    • Digital image display and intensity manipulation automated
    • Segmentation
    • Quantitative parameter extraction
    • Statistical data analysis
    • Software alternatives 

    All CYTO U courses qualify for ICCE continuing education credit.
    Formats Available: Streaming
    Original Seminar Date: May 18, 2013
    On-Demand Release Date: Available Now

    Approved Credit:
  • ISAC: 1 hour ICCE
  • ASCP: 1 hour CMLE

  • Topics & Pricing InformationTopics & Pricing Information Introduction to Image Processing and Analysis for Cytometry (2013 Introduction to Image-Based Cytometry PreCongress Course)
    Collapse Using CellProfiler for Biological Image Analysis

    Mark-Anthony Bray, Ph.D. will present a webinar Using CellProfiler for Biological Image Analysis. Mark earned his B.S. in biomedical engineering from Tulane University in 1996 and his Ph.D. in biomedical engineering from Vanderbilt University in 2003, followed by postdoctoral work in cellular bioengineering at Harvard University. In 2008, he joined the Imaging Platform at the Broad Institute as a computational biologist under the direction of Anne Carpenter. Using his biology and image assay development expertise, he is now involved in the adaptation of image analysis software to specific image-based screens.

    Image-based screens increasingly require the use of automated microscopes which generates hundreds, if not thousands of images at a time. With such large image sets, automatic image analysis is more objective and quantitative and less tedious then visual inspection alone. This webinar is meant to instruct biologists in the use of CellProfiler, an open-source, freely-downloadable software package designed for analyzing such images via a user-friendly interface. Material will begin an introduction of CellProfiler, followed by details for the construction and use of a pipeline for analyzing typical image data. We will also include some of the more important considerations in cellular image analysis, by demonstrating the software on sample images as a realistic use case. Lastly, we will cover measurement export and preparation for additional analysis using  machine-learning tools.

    At the completion of this tutorial, the attendee will have knowledge of the following:
    • Understand the basics of the CellProfiler environment;
    • Design a simple pipeline using the graphic user interface;
    • Test their pipeline and adjust the settings for optimal performance.
     
    Who Should Attend:This tutorial is intended for beginners to quantitative cellular image analysis. No programming skills are required. However, basic knowledge of fluorescence microscopy and digital image acquisition is expected.
    Formats Available: Streaming
    Original Seminar Date: January 14, 2014
    On-Demand Release Date: Available Now

    Approved Credit:
  • ISAC: 1 hour ICCE
  • ASCP: 1 hour CMLE

  • Topics & Pricing InformationTopics & Pricing Information Using CellProfiler for Biological Image Analysis
    Collapse The Signaling Networks Regulating Morphological Heterogeneity

    Chris BakalChris Bakal, Ph.D. will be presenting the webinar "The Signaling Networks Regulating Morphological Heterogeneity." Chris is a Dynamical Cell Systems Team Leader in the Division of Cancer Biology at the Institute of Cancer Research in London UK.  

    The Dynamical Cell Systems Team is using high-throughput functional genomic approaches in tandem with integrative computational technologies to understand the architecture and dynamics of signal transduction networks. He studies the biological switches that cause cells to change shape, become cancerous and spread around the body. By understanding how these switches work, scientists may one day find a way to control them through drugs or other therapies. Cells are able to assume a wide variety of complex shapes in order to carry out different roles and Dr Bakal's team examines the genetic and biochemical mechanisms that underpin these shape changes. Their research covers how both environmental and genetic variation affects cell shape. Ultimately, Dr Bakal aims to understand how normal and cancerous cells can adopt different shapes and why metastatic cancer develops in some people but not others.

    Formats Available: Streaming
    Original Seminar Date: March 20, 2014
    On-Demand Release Date: Available Now

    Approved Credit:
  • ISAC: 1 hour ICCE
  • ASCP: 1 hour CMLE

  • Topics & Pricing InformationTopics & Pricing Information The Signaling Networks Regulating Morphological Heterogeneity
    Collapse FIJI ImageJ: Open Source Image Informatics for Multidimensional Imaging (2014 Scientific Tutorial)
    Modern biological imaging requires informatics tools for the acquisition, analysis, visualization and dissemination of complex multidimensional image datasets. Open Source software has become a powerful tool for image informatics due to its open access, easily customizable interfaces and flexibility. We present the ImageJ based toolkit FIJI (www.fiji.sc) as a platform for interoperability demonstrating how it can be used for basic and advanced analysis of complex image datasets and be interfaced directly with other software tools for visualization, dissemination and acquisition. FIJI can also be easily customized directly by the bench scientist through powerful scripting and plugin functionality. FIJI will be demonstrated and shown with functionality shown for specific advanced features including segmentation and tracking.
    Formats Available: Streaming

    Approved Credit:
  • ISAC: 1.50 hours ICCE
  • ASCP: 1.50 hours CMLE

  • Topics & Pricing InformationTopics & Pricing Information FIJI ImageJ: Open Source Image Informatics for Multidimensional Imaging (2014 Scientific Tutorial)
    Collapse Image Cytometer Performance Characterization and Calibration (2014 Scientific Tutorial)
    Fluorescence microscopes are an important tool for measuring cellular properties. The use of standard instrument performance criteria, such as limit of detection, linear dynamic range, and resolution (point spread function), and reference materials can allow minimal performance criteria to be established for an assay. By applying these minimal performance criteria, data generated by image cytometry instrumentation can assured to be comparable from day to day and from laboratory to laboratory. This tutorial will instruct students on methods available for establishing minimal instrument performance criteria for an image cytometry assay. Students will also be provided with a checklist that can be used to assure that fluorescence microscopy image intensity data is appropriate for quantitative analysis.
    Formats Available: Streaming

    Approved Credit:
  • ISAC: 1.50 hours ICCE
  • ASCP: 1.50 hours CMLE

  • Topics & Pricing InformationTopics & Pricing Information Image Cytometer Performance Characterization and Calibration (2014 Scientific Tutorial)
    Collapse μManager: Open source software for microscope image acquisition

    Nico Stuurman, Ph.D. will be presenting the webinar "μManager: Open source software for microscope image acquisition" on Wednesday, July 23 at 12:00 pm ET. Nico is a Research Associate in the laboratory of Ron Vale at the University of California San Francisco where he is involved in microscopy and computer programming.

    Research microscopes are usually equipped with digital cameras and motorized equipment such as shutters, stages, and filter wheels, necessitating computer control. Several commercial solutions exist, which are often tied to specific hardware, are often available only on Windows, are difficult to extend and incorporate in novel workflows, and do not allow for inspection of the source code. We therefore developed μManager, a freely available open source software package for control of motorized microscopes, which runs as a plugin to ImageJ. μManager is cross-platform (Windows, Mac, and Linux), hardware agnostic (it works with an ever growing number of microscopes and peripherals and device support can be written by anyone), extensible (through scripting and plugin interfaces, as well as hooks to other environments such as Python and Matlab), and is easy to use.

    In this webinar I will give some background about the purpose and capabilities of μManager, demonstrate the most common ways μManager is used to acquire microscope data, highlight a few of the μManager plugins that extend its functionality, and show what is involved in configuring a microscope system.

    This webinar will be useful for microscopists considering the use of μManager as well as for μManager users who want to learn more about the capabilities of the software.

    Formats Available: Streaming, Webinar + Archive
    Original Seminar Date: July 23, 2014
    On-Demand Release Date: Available Now

    Approved Credit:
  • ISAC: 1 hour ICCE
  • ASCP: 1 hour CMLE

  • Topics & Pricing InformationTopics & Pricing Information μManager: Open source software for microscope image acquisition
    Collapse The Use of Nanoparticles for Cell Identification and Tracking

    Paul Rees

    Paul Rees received his degree and Ph.D. in physics from Cardiff University in 1990 and 1993, respectively. Research for his PhD included the calculation of the optical properties of semiconductor lasers and the measurement of spontaneous emission from laser diodes under operating conditions. From 1994 to 1996, he was a Research Fellow at the Department of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland, where his research included the study of self-pulsation in laser diodes and the theory of many-body effects in wide band-gap semiconductors. In 1996, he joined the School of Informatics, University of Wales, Bangor, U.K., where he was appointed Senior Lecturer in 2000. Research interests at Bangor included the effect of optical feedback in laser diodes, the use of chaos for data encryption, quantum computing and the theory of quantum-dot lasers.

    In 2005 he was appointed to a Chair of Nanotechnology in the newly-formed Multidisciplinary Nanotechnology Centre at Swansea University. Current research interests include the theory of the electrical and optical properties of self assembled and colloidal semiconductor quantum dots. Recent research has involved the modelling of biological cell cycles and the use of these theories in deconvolving useful information from high throughput measurement techniques such as flow cytometry and time lapse microscopy. A major focus of current research is the investigation of the uptake of nano and micro-particles in biological cells. Using the high throughput measurement techniques to investigate the heterogeneity of this uptake for large cell populations, allowing the calculation of the statistical distributions for the number particles delivered to a cell. Recent research has involved the application of engineering systems approaches to both biology and medicine in order to deconvolve meaningful information from data.

    Webinar Summary: Colloidal quantum dots are widely used as fluorescent markers for biological cells.  These particles are optically stable and bio-compatible with the cellular environment. The wavelength of the quantum dot fluorescence can be tuned across the optical spectrum by varying the size, structure and chemical composition of the colloidal particles. Initially, colloidal dots were used as direct replacements of existing fluorescence probes but more recently applications have emerged that exploit the unique properties of these nanoparticles.

    In this presentation, Paul will discuss the use of colloidal nanoparticles to measure the proliferation of cells using flow cytometry. Then the use of nanoparticles to track the movement of cells using a fluorescence microscope will be presented and finally he will outline the use of multi-colored nanoparticles to uniquely bar code cells for identification and tracking.

    This continuing medical laboratory education activity is recognized by the American Society for Clinical Pathology for 1 CMLE credit.  ASCP CMLE credits are acceptable for the ASCP Board of Registry Certification Maintenance Program.

    Formats Available: Streaming
    Original Seminar Date: April 16, 2015
    On-Demand Release Date: Available Now

    Approved Credit:
  • ISAC: 1 hour ICCE
  • ASCP: 1 hour CMLE

  • Topics & Pricing InformationTopics & Pricing Information The Use of Nanoparticles for Cell Identification and Tracking
    Collapse Imaging Life at High Spatiotemporal Resolution

    After obtaining a BS in Physics from Caltech, Eric Betzig moved to Cornell, where his thesis involved the development of near-field optics -- the first method to break the diffraction barrier in light microscopy. Betzig became a PI at AT&T Bell Labs in Murray Hill, NJ, where he further refined the technology and explored many applications, including high density data storage, semiconductor spectroscopy, and superresolution fluorescence imaging of cells. In 1993, Betzig was the first to image single fluorescent molecules under ambient conditions, and determine their positions to better than 1/40 of the wavelength of light. Tiring of academia, he served as Vice President of R&D at his father’s machine tool company, developing a high speed motion control technology based on an electrohydraulic hybrid drive with adaptive control algorithms. The commercial failure of the technology left him unemployed and his search for new directions culminated in the invention and demonstration of the superresolution technique PALM by himself and fellow Bell Labs expatriate, Harald Hess. Since 2005, Betzig has been a Group Leader at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Janelia Farm Research Campus, developing new optical imaging technologies for biology. Betzig won the 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for “The development of super-resolved fluorescence microscopy.

    Formats Available: Streaming

    Approved Credit:
  • ASCP: 1 hour CMLE
  • ISAC: 1 hour ICCE

  • Topics & Pricing InformationTopics & Pricing Information Imaging Life at High Spatiotemporal Resolution
    Collapse OMERO in Action

    In this workshop, we will outline and demonstrate the OMERO platform, and show how you can use it to work with your microscopy and/or HCS data. In addition we will demonstrate some of the applications that have been released by OME and some of the integration with 3rd party tools, including: OMERO.figure - fast figures from your OMERO images OMERO.webtagging - automatically tag your data and search for tags ImageJ - improved interaction with OMERO We will also outline other applications and integration e.g. FLIM image data analysis, object tracking, Matlab Analysis tools, etc. We’ve designed OMERO to be as flexible as possible, and this has enabled its use in a range of imaging domains, including light and electron microscopy, high content screening. Come along to the workshop and bring your favourite data

    Course Details or Outline:

    • General introduction: What is OMERO?
    • Importing data into OMERO
    • Image Selection
    • Add to container
    • Tag at import
    • Storage and integrity report
    • File in its original format on disk
    • Organizing data
    • Browsing data
    • Metadata access
    • Image preview and Rendering settings
    • Export as JPEG, OME-TIFF, original
    • Viewing images
    • Projections
    • Split View
    • Save
    • Movie export
    • ROI creation
    • Annotations
    • Tagging
    • File attachments
    • Key-value annotation
    • OMERO.webtagging
    • Batch tagging
    • Searching tag
    • Searching
    • Search by ID
    • Search data
    • Searching across groups.
    • OMERO.figure
    • Figure creation
    • Multi-T & Z series
    • Auto scalebar & labels
    • Cropping to ROIs
    • ImageJ integration
    • Import directly from imageJ
    • ROI reading and writing

     

    Formats Available: Streaming

    Approved Credit:
  • ASCP: 1.50 hours CMLE
  • ISAC: 1.50 hours ICCE

  • Topics & Pricing InformationTopics & Pricing Information OMERO in Action
    Collapse Label-Free Imaging: Ptychography-Label-Free Cytometry

    This tutorial will cover the emerging area of label free microscopy, focusing on ptychography, but also introducing holography and other quantitative and semiquantitative label free imaging approaches for cytometric analysis of cells. Examples of cell cycle, cell proliferation, cell death and live cell tracking will be given. The student will leave with an insight in to what will possibly be the next big area of development in biological imaging. They will be able to understand the basic concepts, need and approaches available and leave enthused about the potential applications that this may open up for themselves and bioimaging in general.

     

    Course Details or Outline:

    1. Basics/Overview of the fundamental physics that lie behind these fast developing label free imaging techniques
    2. A basic outline of how the ptychographic microscope is set-up will be described.
    3. An explanation of how bioimages are acquired, highlighting advantages over labelled techniques and some of its limitations
    4. Discussion of example data sets and their cytometric analysis.
    5. Open discussion - how will label free microscopy develop in the Future
    Formats Available: Streaming

    Approved Credit:
  • ASCP: 1.50 hours CMLE
  • ISAC: 1.50 hours ICCE

  • Topics & Pricing InformationTopics & Pricing Information Label-Free Imaging: Ptychography-Label-Free Cytometry
    Collapse Processing Images Using the Free and Open-Source Software Icy

    This tutorial presents how to investigate an image, by extracting quantitative information. This tutorial is presented as an interactive study which is performed live, using Icy. The audience will participate and will propose interpretation of the problem, and of course, there will be a lot of traps! It covers a large number of topics: understanding the nature of noise in the image, understanding the interest of different representations of the images: the richness of 2D and 3D rendering in different modalities, the use of color maps and the practical use of histograms. In a second step, more advanced algorithms such as wavelets for spot detection and MHT for tracking of particles are also covered.

    During this presentation, a number of Icy's functionalities are covered: visualization, use of ROI, histogram, look up table, running and installing plugins, scripting in JavaScript and Python, graphical scripting using protocols, management of data, method reusability and how to reach unknown functionalities.

    Students coming to this session will learn in a didactic and ludic way why the noise is so important in the images and what the good practices of the image analysis are. In this interactive session, they will discover that one needs to deeply understand his/her data before performing an analysis. Each step performed during this tutorial is reproducible since the software and the data are free and available for download. At the end of the session, the attendants can perform and extend their analysis directly on their laptops!

    Course Details or Outline:

    1. Installing Icy
    2. Opening an image
    3. Understanding the histogram and the look up table (color map)
    4. Finding functionalities in seconds without knowing the software!
    5. The ImageJ compatibility.
    6. Website presentation, browsing script resources and graphical protocols.
    7. The screen is lying to us! Representation of 16bits images.
    8. Interpreting an atomic force microscopy output as an image.
    9. Viewing background information
    10. Viewing data that cannot be displayed in 2D with false color map.
    11. Characterization of noise
    12. Using a 3D ray-traced volume rendering vs a 3D elevation map rendering
    13. Interpretation of the histogram
    14. Data are lying to us: understand the defects of the data acquisition
    15. Detecting density of spots representing neurons in an image
    16. Automatically perform segmentation of cell in an image, and then density detection
    17. Interpreting results
    18. Interpreting results of several users over the same sample
    19. Detection of vesicle and tracking
    20. Description of global and individual movements
    21. Concluding remarks

    Formats Available: Streaming

    Approved Credit:
  • ASCP: 1.50 hours CMLE
  • ISAC: 1.50 hours ICCE

  • Topics & Pricing InformationTopics & Pricing Information Processing Images Using the Free and Open-Source Software Icy
    Collapse Kinetic Image Cytometry of Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes and Neurons

    Patrick McDonough has been interested in microscopy and cell biology, through out his career.    Pat’s initial interests were focused on marine organisms, and he received his Ph.D., in Marine Biology from Scripps Institution of Oceanography, in 1984.  Realizing that his true passion was experimental biology, Pat switched to research on cell biology/physiology, joining the UCSD School of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology, as a post-doctoral fellow.  Pat has always been fascinated with the physiology of cardiac and skeletal muscle cells, and the role of intracellular calcium in contraction and gene expression.  Since the late 1980’s Pat has used fluorescent calcium indicators (e.g., fluo-4, invented by Roger Tsien), to visualize and quantify calcium transients that underlie cellular phenomenon in cardiac myocytes, skeletal muscle, neurons, and other cell types.  The evolution of digital cameras, computers, automated microscopes and image analysis algorithms, set the stage for development of high throughput methods for visualizing calcium and voltage transients in excitable cells.  Pat joined Vala Sciences Inc in 2004 (founded by Jeffrey Price, a pioneer in the automated microscopy and “high content analysis”), to develop cell-based assays for drug-discovery and toxicology.  With funding from NIH STTR/SBIR grants, Vala Sciences, in collaboration with academic researchers at the Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute, developed the Kinetic Image Cytometer (KIC), a purpose-built instrument to quantify calcium or voltage transients, for cells plated in 96- or 384-well formats.  Pats current research develops KIC methods to enable high-throughput screening of chemical compounds/genomic constructs for beneficial or harmful effects relevant to heart failure, arrhythmias, and neurobiology.   

    Webinar Summary:

    Kinetic image cytometry (KIC) creates single cell measurements of dynamics of events such as action potentials and calcium transients in all cells, and is especially compelling for fast-acting cells such as cardiomyocytes and neurons. Kinetic plate readers (e.g., FLIPR and FDSS) provide well-averaged readouts that require synchronized cellular behaviors, whereas our novel KIC parameterizes Ca2+ transients and action potentials on each cell; e.g., typically on 300-500 cardiomyocytes in a field of view simultaneously. Developed collaboratively by Vala Sciences and Jeff Price’s and Mark Mercola’s academic labs at Sanford-Burnham-Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP), KIC has been used to detect arrhythmogenic and toxic effects in early drug discovery, and for drug discovery for heart failure. The presentation will primarily report on the accuracy of KIC for predicting arrhythmia from kinetics of the calcium transients in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs), and will also include some examples of application to hiPSC-derived neurons.

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    This continuing medical laboratory education activity is recognized by the American Society for Clinical Pathology for 1 CMLE credit.  ASCP CMLE credits are acceptable for the ASCP Board of Registry Certification Maintenance Program.

    Formats Available: Streaming
    Original Seminar Date: July 28, 2015
    On-Demand Release Date: Available Now

    Approved Credit:
  • ASCP: 1 hour CMLE
  • ISAC: 1 hour ICCE

  • Topics & Pricing InformationTopics & Pricing Information Kinetic Image Cytometry of Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes and Neurons
    Collapse Slide-Free Histology via MUSE: UV Surface Excitation Microscopy for Imaging Unsectioned Tissue by Richard Levenson

    Richard Levenson, MD, FCAP, is Professor and Vice Chair for Strategic Technologies in the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, UC Davis. He trained in medicine at University of Michigan and pathology at Washington University, and is Board-certified in Anatomic Pathology. A faculty position at Duke was followed by an appointment at Carnegie Mellon University where he helped develop multispectral imaging approaches for pathology and biology. In 1999, he joined CRI to become VP of Research, and served as Principal Investigator on federally funded research to develop multispectral microscopy systems and software for molecular pathology and diagnostics, three-dimensional small-animal imaging, optical dynamic contrast techniques, and birefringence microscopy. He serves on NIH, NCI and NSF review panels, is associate editor of Analytical Cellular Pathology, section editor for Archives of Pathology, and is on the editorial boards of Laboratory Investigation, Cytometry Part A, and Oncopathology. 

    Webinar Summary:

    Slide-free methods for rapid tissue histological analysis can cut hours off usual pathology slide preparation procedures. One approach to accomplish this is MUSE (Microscopy with UV Surface Excitation), which exploits shallow penetration of UV light to excite fluorescent signals from only the most superficial tissue elements. The method is non-destructive, and eliminates the need for conventional histology processing, formalin fixation, paraffin embedding, or thin sectioning. It requires no lasers, confocal, multiphoton or optical coherence tomography optics. MUSE generates diagnostic-quality histological images from fresh or fixed, but unsectioned tissue that can resemble conventional hematoxylin- and eosin-staining, with enhanced topographical information, and can do this rapidly, simply and inexpensively.

    -----

    This continuing medical laboratory education activity is recognized by the American Society for Clinical Pathology for 1 CMLE credit. ASCP CMLE credits are acceptable for the ASCP Board of Registry Certification Maintenance Program.

    Formats Available: Streaming
    Original Seminar Date: September 22, 2015
    On-Demand Release Date: Available Now

    Approved Credit:
  • ISAC: 1 hour ICCE
  • ASCP: 1 hour CMLE

  • Topics & Pricing InformationTopics & Pricing Information Slide-Free Histology via MUSE: UV Surface Excitation Microscopy for Imaging Unsectioned Tissue by Richard Levenson
    Collapse Flow Cytometric Analysis of Endothelial Colony Forming Cells and Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells in Lung Vascular Disease by Kewal Asosingh and Imaging Flow Cytometry in the Study of Immune Cell Functions by Andrew Filby

    Kewal Asosingh

    Flow Cytometric Analysis of Endothelial Colony Forming Cells and Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells in Lung Vascular Disease presented by Kewal Asosingh (ISAC Scholar)

    Dr. Asosingh is a Staff Scientist, Assistant Professor of Molecular Medicine and Scientific Director for Flow Cytometry at Cleveland Clinic’s Lerner Research Institute. In 2011, he was chosen by the International Society for Advancement of Cytometry (ISAC) as an ISAC Scholar, recognition of emerging scientific research leaders in the profession. He has provided Stem Cell Cytometry training seminars at ISAC meetings, chaired oral presentation sessions on personalized medicine, and has been serving as abstract reviewer, member of the program committee for the annual ISAC meetings (“CYTO”) and reviewer for Cytometry Part A. Dr. Asosingh is also co-leader of the CYTO University (CYTO U) eLearning Delivery Task Force. Dr. Asosingh teaches flow cytometry to undergraduate and graduate students at the Cleveland Clinic and at Lakeland Community College. As Scientific Director of the Flow Cytometry Core, he serves as primary contact with investigators to provide advice on experimental design and data analysis/interpretation and assures that data generated by the Flow Core is of the highest quality.

    Webinar Summary:

    Dr. Asosingh’s lab studies bone marrow stem cells in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and pathological angiogenesis in asthma. The group has established mouse models for both diseases, and close collaboration with clinicians facilitates rapid transition of the basic research findings to clinical studies. In the past decade it has become evident that bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells exert functions beyond hematopoiesis. During development, endothelial cells and hematopoietic stem cells originate from a common bipotent mesodermal stem cell called the hemangioblast. In post-natal life, this connection is maintained via paracrine interactions between the endothelium and circulating hematopoietic progenitor cells. Their critical role in vascular homeostasis and repair of endothelial injury has opened new therapeutic perspectives for vascular degenerative diseases. The flipside of the coin is that abnormalities in hematopoiesis may underlie pathological angiogenesis, and this is exactly what his group is focused on.  Recent findings from the group show that hematopoietic stem cells isolated from the bone marrow of PAH patients are able to transfer the disease in humanized NOD SCID mice. PAH is a devastating disease characterized by endothelial cell injury, in situ thrombi and right ventricular hypertrophy. Animals engrafted with hematopoietic stem cells from PAH patients, but not from healthy control participants, had increased mobilization of progenitor cells in the peripheral blood, just like in patients, and strikingly developed many features of PAH.  Current focus of the team is to further reveal the mechanisms by which hematopoietic stem cells cause pulmonary vascular disease. This webinar will provide an overview of the different types of “endothelial progenitor cells” with special emphasis on endothelial colony forming cells and pro-angiogenic hematopoietic progenitor cells and their roles in PAH.

    Andrew Filby

    Imaging Flow Cytometry in the Study of Immune Cell Functions presented by Andrew Filby (SRL Emerging Leader)

    Dr Filby is currently head of the Flow Cytometry Core Facility at Newcastle University.  He leads a dedicated team of flow cytometry specialists with the sole aim of providing a comprehensive, cutting edge cytometry resource to the wider research community at Newcastle University and beyond.  A significant part of his focus is the development of novel cytometry-based techniques that have underpinned several high profile publications including in Science, Cell and the Cytometry Part A paper of the year accolade (2011).  He specialises in Imaging Flow Cytometry and the use of fluorescence dyes to track cell proliferation.  Prior to and post selection as an ISAC Shared Resource Laboratory Emerging Leader (SRLEL), Dr Filby has made several contributions to the Cyto conference programmes including interactive workshops and scientific talks.  He continues to contribute to the efforts of ISAC including serving on the Image Cytometry and E-learning task forces.  In addition to his work within ISAC, he is also heavily involved in supporting cytometry research and education in South America including initiatives for remote support and training.

    Webinar Summary:

    In this short webinar Dr Filby will give a brief overview of his work within the field of Imaging Flow Cytometry and what impact this has had on a number of key publications in the field of immunology and cell cycle biology.  These include the study of asymmetric cell division in the immune system, the measurement of organelle-specific calcium mobilisation in activated T cells and the analysis of the cell cycle in fission yeast.  In each case, the ability to capture and analyse literally thousands of multispectral, spatially registered images was essential to questions each method was designed to address.  Finally, Dr Filby will also discuss what the SRL EL programme means to him and how he hopes it will benefit the wider cytometry community through various initiatives he is involved in.

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    This continuing medical laboratory education activity is recognized by the American Society for Clinical Pathology for 1 CMLE credit. ASCP CMLE credits are acceptable for the ASCP Board of Registry Certification Maintenance Program.

    Formats Available: Streaming, Webinar + Archive
    Original Seminar Date: November 16, 2015
    On-Demand Release Date: Available Now

    Approved Credit:
  • ASCP: 1 hour CMLE
  • ISAC: 1 hour ICCE

  • Topics & Pricing InformationTopics & Pricing Information Flow Cytometric Analysis of Endothelial Colony Forming Cells and Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells in Lung Vascular Disease by Kewal Asosingh and Imaging Flow Cytometry in the Study of Immune Cell Functions by Andrew Filby
    Collapse Visualization and Analysis of Massive Scale Neuroscience Images using Vaa3D by Hanchuan Peng, Xiaoxia Liu & Zhi Zhou. Moderated by Stephen Lockett

     Hanchuan PengHanchuan Peng is a group leader at the Allen Institute for Brain Science, Seattle, USA. Inventor of a number of algorithms and software/hardware systems, including Vaa3D, BrainAligner, NeuronTracers, SmartScope, mRMR, 3D Virtual Finger, SmartACT, TeraFly, etc. A proponent for BioImage Informatics meetings, Brain Informatics conferences, journals (Bioinformatics, BMC Bioinformatics, and Brain Informatics), and BigNeuron and Open Interface of Bioimaging Software. 

     

     


    Xiaoxiao Liu is a research scientist and a Vaa3D developer at  the Allen Institute for Brain Science.  She is currently focusing on analyzing large-scale neuron morphology data and evaluating automatic neuron tracing algorithms for the BigNeuron project.  Her research interest include brain informatics,  biomedical image analysis, and high dimensional data visualization. 

     

     

     

     

    Zhi Zhou is a scientist at the Allen Institute for Brain Science, Seattle, USA. His research interest is in automatic 3D reconstruction of large-scale neurons to quantify neuronal morphology and identify cell types. He also focuses on developing algorithms and tools in order to improve the performance of large-scale image visualization and analysis.

    http://home.penglab.com/index.html

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    This continuing medical laboratory education activity is recognized by the American Society for Clinical Pathology for 1 CMLE credit.  ASCP CMLE credits are acceptable for the ASCP Board of Registry Certification Maintenance Program.

    Formats Available: Streaming, Webinar + Archive
    Original Seminar Date: March 31, 2016
    On-Demand Release Date: Available Now

    Approved Credit:
  • ISAC: 1 hour ICCE
  • ASCP: 1 hour CMLE

  • Topics & Pricing InformationTopics & Pricing Information Visualization and Analysis of Massive Scale Neuroscience Images using Vaa3D by Hanchuan Peng, Xiaoxia Liu & Zhi Zhou. Moderated by Stephen Lockett
    Collapse Quantitative Live Cell Microscopy
    Formats Available: Streaming, Live Webinar, Live Webinar + Recording
    Original Seminar Date: April 25, 2017
    On-Demand Release Date: April 25, 2017

    Approved Credit:
  • ISAC: 1 hour ICCE

  • Topics & Pricing InformationTopics & Pricing Information Quantitative Live Cell Microscopy